Ouzir

Ouzir

The international conference on wireless networks and mobile communications (WINCOM'17) will be held in the imperial city and administrative capital of Morocco, Rabat, on November 01-04, 2017. WINCOM'17 aims at examining the various challenges in the areas of wireless networks & mobile communications. The conference will provide a forum for exchanging ideas, discussing solutions, and sharing experiences among researchers and professionals from both academia and industry interested in wireless networks and mobile communications. WINCOM has been organized for the last four years, and that is in the form of two workshops. The first edition was held in Fez on December 25th, 2013. The second in Rabat on December 18th, 2014. In the third edition, WINCOM switches to the conference size that was organized in the imperial city of Morocco, Marrakech on October 20-23, 2015. The fourth edition was organized in the imperial city and scientific capital of Morocco, Fez, on October 26-29, 2016.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  •  Cooperative/non-cooperative communications
  •  Game theory applied to networking problems
  •  Learning theory to solve networking problems
  •  Modeling and performance evaluation
  •  Energy efficient communications and green networking
  •  Interference mitigation
  •  Physical layer design and Signal processing
  •  Channel capacity estimation, modeling and equalization
  •  Radio resource management, allocation and scheduling
  •  Congestion, load and admission control
  •  Smart antennas: MIMO, Massive MIMO and beamforming
  •  Reconfigurability, adaptivity in MAC and PHY layers
  •  Adaptive and cognitive MAC
  •  Cross-layer design involving MAC layer
  •  Routing and QoS provisioning
  •  Multihop communications: Ad hoc, WSN, DTN, VANET
  •  P2P services for multimedia
  •  Self-adaptation on the service layer
  •  Mobility Issues and continuity of services
  •  Beyond 4G and 5G communications
  •  M2M and MTC communications
  •  Cognitive radio networks
  •  Implementation, testbeds and prototypes
  •  Security issues and privacy
  •  Body area networks
  •  Internet of things (IoT)
  •  Future Internet and next-generation networking
  •  Mobile cloud computing
  •  Emerging Internet applications
  •  Context and location-awareness in pervasive systems
  •  Emerging wireless and mobile applications
  •  User interfaces, user-machine interactions
  •  User interfaces, user-machine interactions
  •  Secure network and service access
  •  Service discovery and portability
  •  Service oriented architectures
  •  Mobile health care and medical applications

WEBSITE: http://www.wincom-conf.org/ 


Science Careers has teamed up with some great organizations to bring you information about the latest career opportunities in many different fields. The profiles included in this booklet give you a sense of the types of organizations that are accepting resumes and the kinds of positions they offer. We've also included some articles with some general tips and advice on job searching.

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Déjà Vu

Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself.

The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.

Déjà Vécu

Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu.

Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 

Déjà Visité

Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 

Déjà Senti

Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.

You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.

Jamais Vu

Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.

Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.

Presque Vu

Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 

L’esprit de l’Escalier

L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 

Capgras Delusion

Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.

Fregoli Delusion

Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.

It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.

Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.

SOURCE


Dear Researcher,

The annual Eppendorf & Science Prize for Neurobiology is an international award which honors young scientists for their outstanding contributions to neurobiological research based on methods of molecular and cell biology. The winner and finalists are selected by a committee of independent scientists, chaired by Science’s Senior Editor, Dr. Peter Stern. Researchers who are not older than 35 years are invited to apply.

The winner receives

  • Prize money of US$25,000
  • Publication in Science of an essay by the winner about his/her research
  • Full support to attend the Prize Ceremony held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in the USA
  • An invitation to visit Eppendorf in Hamburg, Germany
  • Up to three finalists are honored, too!


Application deadline: June 15, 2017

Congratulations to Gilad Evrony on winning the 2016 Eppendorf & Science Prize for his work on developing technologies to sequence and analyze the genomes of single cells from the human brain. Dr. Evrony’s research has revealed a diversity of mutations in neuronal genomes indicating that every neuron in the brain carries a unique fingerprint of somatic mutations. Such mutations can cause focal brain malformations and may have a role in other unsolved neurologic diseases. The technology also allows, for the first time, reconstruction of developmental lineage trees in the human brain to study how cells proliferate and migrate to build the brain.

It’s easy to apply!
Learn more at www.eppendorf.com/prize


On behalf of ISANH International and ISANH Middle East, it is a great pleasure to announce the organization of ISANH Middle East Antioxidants World Congress which will be held in Beirut, Lebanon, on May 3-4, 2017.

The aim of this international congress is to gather all stakeholders in antioxidants field and their impact on nutrition and health. Participants will majority come from Middle East, Africa, Europe & Asia to discuss about some strategic axes during ISANH Middle East 2017.

Beirut Antioxidants 2017 congress will be dedicated to different targets:

  • Antioxidants & Oxidative Stress in health and medicine
  • Antioxidants & functional ingredients used in food & beverage industry
  • Practical applications of antioxidants in cosmetic industry
  • Dietary Supplements in Middle East

Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress in Health & Medicine

On the first part, the scientific committee will allocate time to discuss about oxidative stress and chronic diseases. We will present the recent advances and discuss how to decrease and modulate oxidative stress related diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, infertility…

Clinical studies will be selected to present the subtle effects of antioxidants on health.

Antioxidants & Medical Food: Toward the personalization of medicine

During this session, the scientific committee will present the antioxidants in medical food for diabetes & obesity, cancer, ageing, neurodegenerative diseases and also specific medical food for babies and seniors.

Antioxidants & Functional ingredients in food and beverage

We cannot talk about beneficial effects of antioxidants without presenting how to formulate and use natural antioxidants.

During this session, we will answer the following questions:

  • How to use antioxidants to prevent food & beverage oxidation?
  • How to use antioxidants as antiomicrobial, natural conservators, antibacterial actor?
  • How to decrease glycation and Maillard Reaction?
  • How to decrease acrylamide formation?

A debate will be organized on the strategic theme: Natural vs synthetic antioxidants: bioavailability, toxicity and impact on gut microbiota.

A special session is dedicated to the valorization of natural sources of antioxidants, industrial byproducts as well as functional ingredients in the Middle East.

Practical Applications of Antioxidants in Cosmetic Industries

During this session we will discuss about the new trends in scientific research regarding the antioxidants in the cosmetic field. As for example:

  • Antioxidant strategies to delay skin ageing 
  • Targeting skin mitochondria: A promising strategy
  • How to increase skin antioxidant defense system?
  • Antioxidants to treat dermatologic disorders
  • Antioxidant and skin bioavailability: Recent advances and future vision

Dietary Supplements in the Middle East

Many antioxidants are used in many dietary supplements formulations to prevent diseases. The aim of session is to discuss about the recent advances, clinical studies, regulation and marketing of antioxidants in dietary supplements.

The status and regulation of dietary supplements in Europe is completely different than in Middle East. 

A round table discussion will be organized to discuss and how to harmonize the European and Middle East regulation?

https://www.isanh-me.com/welcome-2


We invite you to join us at the upcoming 13th International Conference on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases and related neurological disorders. The groundbreaking series of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases Conferences attract international medical and scientific professionals worldwide. The Conference is at the forefront of unraveling the mechanisms and improving the treatment of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other related neurodegenerative diseases. AD/PDTM Conferences uniquely combine distinct neurodegenerative diseases in one setting and examine their similarities and differences; a strong focus is mechanisms of disease, prevention and therapy.

The forthcoming AD/PDTM meeting, in 2017 will take place in Vienna, Austria, one of the most classical cities in Europe.
 
The continuing success of the AD/PDTM meetings is the result of several key ingredients:​
  1. A high-quality scientific program covering most recent research, developments, and treatments, with emphasis on overlaps and congruent results among AD, PD and related neurological disorders.
  2. A multidisciplinary mix of participants representing both clinical investigators and basic scientists; as well as both established investigators and young upcoming talents.
  3. An International Scientific Advisory Board covering a broad range of expertise in AD, PD and related neurological disorders.
  4. A concerted attempt to provide an ambiance at the Conference that encourages interaction, exchange of ideas and networking opportunities among all participants.
  5. Travel grants and various awards to junior faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students, intended to encourage attendance by young scientists at the Conference.​​​​​
 
The remarkable success of the series of AD/PDTM Conferences is evident from the progressive increases from one congress to the next, in the number of participants to 3,152 in Nice in 2015, the number of countries represented to 81 in Nice, and the ratio of individuals below the age of 35 to that of the rest of the group. At AD/PDTM 2017 in Vienna we anticipate an attendance of more than 3500 participants.
 
The reason for this success is the uniqueness of the AD/PDTM meetings, their academic quality combined with the interactive and collegial environment. We believe that there is no other Conference in the world that presents such a high level of science in a condensed manner on one hand, yet on the other hand, provides an enormously comfortable atmosphere in which to enjoy it all.
 
We invite you to join us at the 13th International Conference on AD and PD, and we hope to welcome you in the Spring of 2017, in beautiful Vienna.
 

Red is good – the brain uses color to help us choose what to eat

Red means “Green light, go for it!” Green means: “hmm, better not!” Like an upside down traffic light in our brain, color helps us decide whether or not to eat something. This, according to a study at the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste and recently published in the journal Scientific Reports stating that vision is the main sense we use to guide us in food choices. To evaluate calorie intake, we rely on a “color code.”

“According to some theories, our visual system evolved to easily identify particularly nutritious berries, fruits and vegetables from jungle foliage,” says Raffaella Rumiati, SISSA neuroscientist and coordinator of the new study. The human visual system is trichromatic: in the retina, the light-sensitive organ of the eye, there are three classes of photoreceptors (cones) tuned preferentially to three different bands of the visible spectrum. This implies that we can see a large number of colors (more than monochromatic and dichromatic animals, less than those with 4, even 5 types of photoreceptor). “We are particularly efficient at distinguishing red from green,” says Rumiati. This sophistication testifies to the fact that we are “visual animals,” unlike others, dogs, for example, who depend on their sense of smell. “It is mainly the color of food that guides us, and our experiments show how,” explains Rumiati. “To date, only a few studies have been focused on the topic.”

What do we look for in food? Nutrition, of course, or calorie-dense content, and high protein. “In natural foods, color is a good predictor of calories,” explains Francesco Foroni, SISSA researcher and first author of the study. “The redder an unprocessed food is, the more likely it is to be nutritious, while green foods tend to be low in calories.” Our visual system is clearly adapted to this regularity. “The participants in our experiments judged foods whose color tended towards red as higher in calories, while the opposite was true for greens,” continues Giulio Pergola, a researcher at the University of Bari, and one of the authors of the study. “This is also true for processed, or cooked foods, where color loses its effectiveness as an indicator of calories.”

Actually, the scientific literature shows clearly that cooked foods are favored over natural foods and the phenomenon has been observed even in other species besides humans. “Cooked foods are always preferred because, compared to natural foods, there is more nutrition for the same quantity,” explains Rumiati. “With cooked foods, however, the dominance of red over green no longer provides reliable information, which might lead us to believe that the brain would not apply the rule to processed foods. On the contrary, it does, which hints at the presence of ancient evolutionary mechanisms from before the introduction of cooking.”

Another nod in favor of this hypothesis is the fact that the color code in the Rumiati and colleagues experiments does not come into play for items other than food: “The preference for red over green is not observed with non-edible objects,” says Rumiati. “This means that the color code of the visual system activates correctly only with food stimuli.”

Inner traffic light for eating healthier

Our findings, besides increasing our knowledge of the visual system, offer interesting possibilities on many fronts which could have an important impact on the public health: marketing food, for example, and treating eating disorders. “Much is being done today to encourage healthier eating,” notes Rumiati. “For example, trying to convince the people to eat foods lower in calories.” Some countries propose bans on certain types of products, such as carbonated soft drinks and high fat foods. In some cases, there is a disclaimer on the packaging, as with cigarettes. Perhaps food color could be used to produce significant results, even if artificial. “

Source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-11/isoa-rig111116.php


What can Google tell us about ‘the memory web’ in the brain?

A new study by researchers from the Centre for Systems Neuroscience at the University of Leicester, in collaboration with the University of California Los Angeles, has helped to untangle ‘the memory web’ by shedding light on how neurons in memory-related areas provide a long-term coding of associations between concepts.

The team also used internet search engines such as Google and Bing for exploring a much larger database of associations between concepts and then explored more comprehensively how neurons represent the intricate web of associations and memories.

The research, which was published in the journal Nature Communications, shows that these neurons fire to relatively few concepts, which tend to be largely related.

Senior author Professor Rodrigo Quian Quiroga from the Centre for Systems Neuroscience at the University of Leicester explained: “We have previously proposed that these neurons – the ‘Jennifer Aniston’ neurons - are the building blocks of memory.

“They represent concepts and the links between them. In fact, these concepts and their associations are the skeleton of the memories we store. In line with this view, we tend to remember concepts and forget countless number of details. Not surprisingly, such details are not even encoded by these neurons.”

First author Emanuela De Falco, who is currently finishing her PhD at the University of Leicester, added: ”I am really glad I had the chance to do my PhD in such a fascinating area of research, having the opportunity to record directly from neurons of patients and integrating results obtained with these neural recordings with behavioural and web-based results. I found it incredibly interesting to see how, after thousands of web searches, the web metric was actually able to tell us something about the neurons we recorded.”

The team showed sets of pictures - about 100 per experiment - to patients implanted with clinical electrodes for clinical reasons, which allowed them to study how dozens of simultaneously recorded neurons in awake and behaving human subjects responded to the presented pictures.

The team then asked subjects how much they related a subset - about 10-20 - of these pictures with each other and defined a degree of association for all the pictures presented based on internet searches.

They found that whenever neurons fire to more than one concept, these tend to be related both according to the subjects’ scores and the internet searches.

Professor Quiroga added: “Interestingly, the patients were not performing a memory task, they were just passively watching pictures. So, the coding of associations is not contingent to the performance of a task – in which case, it could be argued that neurons temporarily encode such associations and then do something else – but it rather represents a long-term memory storage.”

Source: http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/press-releases/2016/november/what-can-google-tell-us-about-2018the-memory-web2019-in-the-brain


A review of worldwide studies has found that add-on treatment with high-dose b-vitamins -- including B6, B8 and B12 -- can significantly reduce symptoms of schizophrenia more than standard treatments alone.

Therecent study -- on the effect of vitamin and mineral supplements on symptoms of schizophrenia -- is funded by The Medical Research Council and University of Manchester, and is published in Psychological Medicine, one of the world's leading psychology journals

Lead author Joseph Firth, based at the University's Division of Psychology and Mental Health, said: "Looking at all of the data from clinical trials of vitamin and mineral supplements for schizophrenia to date, we can see that B vitamins effectively improve outcomes for some patients.

"This could be an important advance, given that new treatments for this condition are so desperately needed."

Schizophrenia affects around 1% of the population and is among the most disabling and costly long term conditions worldwide.

Currently, treatment is based around the administration of antipsychotic drugs.

Although patients typically experience remission of symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions within the first few months of treatment, long-term outcomes are poor; 80% of patients relapse within five years.

The researchers reviewed all randomized clinical trials reporting effects of vitamin or mineral supplements on psychiatric symptoms in people with schizophrenia.

In what is the first meta-analysis carried out on this topic, they identified 18 clinical trials with a combined total of 832 patients receiving antipsychotic treatment for schizophrenia.

B-vitamin interventions which used higher dosages or combined several vitamins were consistently effective for reducing psychiatric symptoms, whereas those which used lower doses were ineffective.

Also, the available evidence also suggests that B-vitamin supplements may be most beneficial when implemented early on, as b-vitamins were most likely to reduce symptoms when used in studies of patients with shorter illness durations.

Firth added: "High-dose B-vitamins may be useful for reducing residual symptoms in people with schizophrenia, although there were significant differences among the findings of the studies we looked at."

"There is also some indication that these overall effects may be driven by larger benefits among subgroups of patients who have relevant genetic or dietary nutritional deficiencies."

Co-author Jerome Sarris, Professor of Integrative Mental Health at Western Sydney University, added: "This builds on existing evidence of other food-derived supplements, such as certain amino-acids, been beneficial for people with schizophrenia.

"These new findings also fit with our latest research examining how multi-nutrient treatments can reduce depression and other disorders."

The research team say more studies are now needed to discover how nutrients act on the brain to improve mental health, and to measure effects of nutrient-based treatments on other outcomes such as brain functioning and metabolic health.

 

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170216103913.htm


47th Annual Meeting of the German Society for Immunology

Celebrating 50 years DGfI

Celebrating 50 years DGfI

 

12-15 September 2017 • Erlangen, Germany

 

 

 

  

Call for Abstracts

 

   
Dear colleagues,

On behalf of the board of the German Society for Immunology (DGfI) we are delighted to invite you to participate in our 47th Annual Meeting of the German Society for Immunology to be held in Erlangen, Germany from 12-15 September 2017.

Abstract Submission:
We kindly request your active support by submitting your scientific contribution by 7 May 2017 to the following abstract topics online.

Submit your abstract now!

For further information and to get an overview of our preliminary program, please download our flyer here.

Symposium Young Immunologists:
The symposium for Young Immunologists provides our outstanding young scientists with a special platform to present their work as oral presentation to a large audience. All pre-doctoral and doctoral students as well as postdocs with a doctorate not older than 2 years can additionally apply online during the abstract submission.

Registration:
Register now and save up to 30% until June 30, 2017!
Please note that submission of an abstract does not automatically register you for the conference.

New: Social evening accompanied by a Scientific Plenary Debate on Friday
To round off our annual meeting and the 50th anniversary of the DGfI, the social evening will – as a highlight – be shifted to the end of our conference, on Friday, 15 September 2017

Updates and any necessary information regarding organizational remarks can be found on our conference website www.immunology-conference.de.

For further questions please contact the organizing agency Conventus Congressmanagement via Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser.  

I am looking forward to welcoming you to this very special meeting in Erlangen!

With best regards,

Prof. Dr. Hans-Martin Jäck
Conference Chair DGfI 2017


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The main criterion for election as a ARABWAYS Member is scientific excellence. Only those scientists who have made significant contributions to the advancement of science can be nominated as Members

Becoming a member is easy! Just make sure you have all of the items listed below :

  • Curriculum Vitae/Resume
  • Students and Postdocs: Proof of enrollment/status such as letter of acceptance and contact information for a department/faculty contact. 
  • Membership form