Ouzir

Ouzir

Submit an application, if you

  • are a future leader from a non-European transition or developing country (see list of countries)
  • are active in any of the following areas: scientific, engineering-based, legal, economic, health-related or social aspects of climate change
  • are interested in spending a year working with a host of your choice in Germany on a research-based project you have developed yourself in the field of climate protection and climate-related resource conservation


We offer you

  • a monthly fellowship of between €2,150 and €2,650, depending on your qualifications
  • individual mentoring during your stay in Germany
  • additional financial support for items such as family members accompanying you, travel expenses or a German language course
  • a three-week introductory phase, during which you will have the opportunity to make contact with other climate protection fellows and visit companies, research institutions and cultural events in Germany
  • extensive alumni sponsorship, particularly to help you sustain contact with collaborative partners in Germany during your entire professional career

Please see the Programme information (PDF | HTML) for details of the application requirements and fellowship specifications.

The closing date for applications is 1 March 2017. 20 fellowships can be granted.


The third International Ocean Colour Science (IOCS) meeting will take place from 15 to 18 May 2017 in Lisbon, Portugal, followed by a Copernicus marine data stream training event on 19 May 2017. IOCS-2017 is being convened by the International Ocean Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG) in partnership with, and thanks to sponsorship from, EUMETSAT, ESA, the European Commission and NASA, and with the support of all the IOCCG-sponsoring agencies and organisations.

The overarching theme of IOCS-2017 is “Exploring New Capabilities for Global Ocean Colour Observations” with the overall goal of nurturing a strong global user community for ocean colour science and applications, and fostering exchange between the ocean colour research community and international space agencies with an interest in ocean colour science.

Meeting website


The 2017 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop (HRP IWS 2017) is the annual meeting for NASA- and NSBRI-funded investigators. The meeting will be held Monday, January 23 through Thursday, January 26, 2017, at the Galveston Island Convention Center (GICC) in Galveston, TX.

The workshop’s goal is to provide an informal, collegial atmosphere for cross-disciplinary interaction. 

The theme of the workshop is A New Dawn: Enabling Human Space Exploration.

Scientific sessions featuring presentations by principal investigators will be organized according to NASA Human Research Program elements:

  • Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC)
  • Human Factor and Behavioral Performance (HFBP)
  • Human Health Countermeasures (HHC)
  • International Space Station Medical Projects (ISSMP)
  • Space Radiation (SR)

In order to encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration, this year’s meeting will run in concurrence with the annual gathering of the 28th Annual Space Radiation Investigators’ Workshop. 

The workshop program will be made available on this website in December 2016. To help you prepare your oral presentation or poster accordingly, please remember to check the program after it is posted to view your assigned presentation type.

Overview of Schedule


The Society of Neuroscientists of Africa (SONA) is the largest organisation of Neuroscientists on the African continent and serves as the umbrella organisation for all African national neuroscience societites. SONA conference is a biennial, pan-African event that rotates all over the continent, with most recent instalments in Rabat, Morocco (2013) and Durban, South Africa (2015).

In June 2017, we are proud to host the 13th installment of the Society of Neuroscience of Africa conference, for the first time, in Kampala, Uganda. The conference will take place over a total of four days filled with dozens of symposia and plenary lectures by top international speakers covering diverse areas of brain research, with a special focus on topics of particular relevance to Africa and its scientific development.

SONA 2017 Theme: Neuroscience: a tool for the advancement of the African scientific community.

Sub-themes:

  1. Basics of neuroscience and application to life in Africa: relevance for education, health, and general welfare.
  2. Scientific Training and Teaching: from neuroscience tools to research capacity development
  3. Neuroscience driven Technology and innovation for economic growth: Diagnostics, drugs and apps
  4. Promoting Neuroscience: Identification of gaps and harmonization of resources for African neuroscientists

Venue: Imperial Resort Beach Hotel, Entebbe, Uganda

Dates: June 11-14th 2017

Calls for Abstracts are expected to open in late fall 2016.

Registration: January 2017 (early bird); March 2017 (normal)

SONA 2017 is jointly organised between Makerere University and TReND in Africa.


Our brains have a detailed picture of our hands and fingers, and that persists even decades after an amputation, Oxford University researchers have found. The finding could have implications for the control of next generation prosthetics.

Team leader, Dr. Tamar Makin said: ‘It has been thought that the hand 'picture’ in the brain, located in the primary somatosensory cortex, could only be maintained by regular sensory input from the hand. In fact, textbooks teach that the 'picture’ will be 'overwritten’ if its primary input stops. If that was the case, people who have undergone hand amputation would show extremely low or no activity related to its original focus in that brain area- in our case, the hand. However, we also know that people experience phantom sensations from amputated body parts, to the extent that someone asked to move a finger can 'feel’ that movement.

'We wanted to look at the information underlying brain activity in phantom movements, to see how it varied from the brain activity of people moving actual hands and fingers.’

The team, from Oxford’s Hand and Brain Lab, used an ultra-high power (7T) MRI scanner to look at brain activity in two people who had lost their left hand through amputation 25 and 31 years ago but who still experienced vivid phantom sensations, and eleven people who retained both hands and were right handed. Each person was asked to move individual fingers on their left hand.

Study leader, Ms. Sanne Kikkert said: 'We found that while there was less brain activity related to the left hand in the amputees, the specific patterns making up the composition of the hand picture still matched well to the two-handed people in the control group.’

'We confirmed our findings by working with a third amputee, who had also experienced a loss of any communication between the remaining part of their arm and their brain. Even this person had a residual representation of their missing hand’s fingers, 31 years after their amputation.’

One of those involved in the study was Chris Sole. Chris, whose hand was amputated in 1989, has taken part in a number of studies and was chosen for this study specifically because of the strong sense of movement in his amputated hand that he still experiences. He explained: 'You feel like you can move your fingers and you have individual control.

'I am always happy to take part in this team’s studies. Especially if it can help other people, the more they can learn the better.’

The current study provides a new opportunity to unlock one of the most mysterious questions about the brain’s ability to adaptively change to new circumstances - what happens to the brain once a key input is lost? To answer this question, scientists so far resorted to studying representations of the remaining (unaffected) inputs to see if these have changed. This approach leaves unexplored the possibility that the original function of the brain may be preserved, though latent. By studying phantom sensations in amputees these findings overturn established thinking in neuroscience by showing the brain maintains activity despite a drastic change in inputs.

Although these findings provide new insight about the brain’s ability to change, they are compatible with other studies of the brain’s visual cortex that found that degenerative eye disease limiting visual input did not change the brain’s representation of the visual field.

Sanne Kikkert said: 'It seems that even, as previously thought, the brain does carry out reorganisation when sensory inputs are lost, it does not erase the original function of a brain area.’

'This would remove a barrier to neuroprosthetics - prosthetic limbs controlled directly by the brain - the assumption that a person would lose the brain area that could control the prosthetic. If the brain retains a representation of the individual fingers, this could be exploited to provide the fine-grained control needed.’

SOURCE

 

 


A research group under the leadership of Linköping University Professor Markus Heilig has identified an enzyme whose production is turned off in nerve cells of the frontal lobe when alcohol dependence develops. The deficiency in this enzyme leads to continued use of alcohol despite adverse consequences.

The discovery is now published in the number-one ranked psychiatric journal from the Nature Publishing Group, and could mean completely new possibilities for treating alcoholism.

“We’ve worked hard for this. The enzyme, PRDM2, has previously been studied in cancer research, but we didn’t know that it has a function in the brain,” says Markus Heilig, professor of psychiatry and head of the Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN) at Linköping University.

He and his research group are linking together research into alcoholism and other addictive illnesses with advanced brain research. It has long been suspected that people with alcohol dependence have impaired function in the frontal lobes of the brain, but the underlying biological mechanisms have not been known. The research team behind the paper, which includes researchers from both Linköping University and University of Miami, is the first to identify this molecular mechanism.

If frontal function is impaired, it is difficult for us to control our impulses. A person with intact impulse control can walk past a bar on a warm day and think ‘A beer would be nice, but I can’t have one now because I have to get back to work’. An alcoholic does not have sufficient impulse control to refrain, thinking: ‘It’s hot and I’m thirsty’.

“PRDM2 controls the expression of several genes that are necessary for effective signalling between nerve cells. When too little enzyme is produced, no effective signals are sent from the cells that are supposed to stop the impulse,” Professor Heilig tells us.

Several years of dedicated research lie behind this breakthrough. The research, in which Dr Estelle Barbier – post-doctoral fellow at CSAN – had a central role, has shown that alcohol dependence in rats leads to a down-regulation of PRDM2 production, which in turn leads to disruption of impulse control. This is why the laboratory animals continue to consume alcohol, even when it is unpleasant. If they are subjected to stress, they also quickly relapse into drinking alcohol.

In the next step, the researchers knocked out the production of PRDM2 in the frontal lobes of rats that were not dependent, and they observed the same behaviour – impulse control was disrupted.

“We see how a single molecular manipulation gives rise to important characteristics of an addictive illness. Now that we’re beginning to understand what’s happening, we hope we’ll also be able to intervene. Over the long term, we want to contribute to developing effective medicines, but over the short term the important thing, perhaps, is to do away with the stigmatisation of alcoholism,” Professor Heilig says.

 

Original Article


The ICGG 2017: 19th International Conference on Geology and Geophysics aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Geology and Geophysics. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Geology and Geophysics.

Call for Contributions

All honorable authors are kindly encouraged to contribute to and help shape the conference through submissions of their research abstracts, papers and e-posters. Also, high quality research contributions describing original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, or theoretical work in all areas of Geology and Geophysics are cordially invited for presentation at the conference. The conference solicits contributions of abstracts, papers and e-posters that address themes and topics of the conference, including figures, tables and references of novel research materials.WASET

Conference Proceedings

All submitted conference papers will be blind peer reviewed by three competent reviewers. The post conference proceedings will be abstracted and indexed in the International Science Index , and submitted to be indexed in the Google Scholar, Scopus and Thomson Reuters. The conference abstracts and proceedings book, CD and certificate of presentation will be distributed to participants at the conference registration desk. 

Special Journal Issues

ICGG 2017 has teamed up with the Special Journal Issue on Geology and Geophysics. A number of selected high-impact full text papers will also be considered for the special journal issues. All submitted papers will have the opportunity to be considered for this Special Journal Issue. The paper selection will be carried out during the peer review process as well as at the conference presentation stage. Submitted papers must not be under consideration by any other journal or publication. The final decision for paper selection will be made based on peer review reports by the Guest Editors and the Editor-in-Chief jointly. Selected full-text papers will be published online free of charge. 

Conference Sponsor and Exhibitor Opportunities

The Conference offers the opportunity to become a conference sponsor or exhibitor. To participate as a sponsor or exhibitor, please download and complete the Conference Sponsorship Request Form.

Important Dates

Abstracts/Full-Text Paper Submission Deadline   November 21, 2016
Notification of Acceptance/Rejection   November 30, 2016
Final Paper (Camera Ready) Submission & Early Bird Registration Deadline   January 26, 2017
Conference Dates   February 26 - 27, 2017

Important Notes

Please ensure your submission meets WASET's strict guidelines for accepting academic papers. Downloadable versions of the check list for Full-Text Papers and Abstract Papers


Dans cette édition 2017, un programme extrêmement diversifié et novateur, grâce aux très nombreuses propositions faites au Comité Scientifique par la communauté psychiatrique, nous permettra de cheminer au travers des multiples facettes de la psychiatrie. Citons tout particulièrement les sessions sur la psychopharmacologie du 3e millénaire et le staging dans la schizophrénie, les connaissances approfondies sur l’état de stress post-traumatique ou encore la dysrégulation émotionnelle chez le bipolaire euthymique.

Notre ambition est d’assurer une mission de formation continue en psychiatrie pour que chaque participant ressorte du congrès en ayant mis en perspective ses connaissances et sa pratique, au gré des évolutions de notre métier. C’est pourquoi les sessions Connaissances approfondies, qui permettent en 2 heures de faire un point sur une pathologie et/ou une stratégie thérapeutique et sont chaque année plébiscitées, auront lieu dans les plus grandes salles du Palais de Congrès. Parallèlement, de nombreuses sessions permettront de rendre compte aussi bien des avancées scientifiques en psychiatrie et des nouvelles pistes thérapeutiques que des grandes questions sociétales et culturelles qui animent ou interpellent notre pratique et sont au cœur de la philosophie de l’Encéphale.

Retrouvons-nous à Paris les 18, 19 et 20 janvier 2017 avec nos partenaires (associations et sociétés savantes) pour partager notre passion pour la clinique psychiatrique !

Congrès de l’Encéphale

 


the annual Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences is the convergence of over 70 scholarly associations, each holding their annual conference under one umbrella. Now in its 86th year, this flagship event is much more than Canada’s largest gathering of scholars. Congress brings together academics, researchers, policy-makers, and practitioners to share findings, refine ideas, and build partnerships that will help shape the Canada of tomorrow.

Typically spanning seven days in late May and early June, and attracting over 8,000 attendees, Congress is organized by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences and hosted by a different Canadian university each year. The Federation, host university, scholarly associations and partners develop a full week of presentations, workshops, panels, public lectures, cultural events and receptions. It also features Canada’s largest academic trade show. The result? Luminaries, researchers, practitioners, policy-makers and students from across Canada and abroad meet, share ideas and engage in discussions that have direct importance for Canada and the lives of Canadians.

Congress programming is open to attendees, academics and non-academic audiences. From theatre research, literature studies and history to education, sociology and communications, Congress represents a unique showcase of scholarly excellence, creativity, and leadership.

Congress 2017 is being hosted by Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario. The theme for this year’s Congress is “From Far and Wide: The Next 150.”


Wellcome grant schemes

Published in Grants & Awards novembre 19 2016 0 Tagged under

Wellcome exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive.

If you’ve got a great idea in the areas we support, browse our grant schemes to find the one that’s right for you.

51 schemes available

Investigator Awards in Science

Offering flexible funding support to researchers at all career stages working on important questions of relevance to our scientific remit.

Investigator Awards in Humanities and Social Science

Offering flexible funding support to researchers in established posts at all career stages working on important questions of relevance to health.

Collaborative Awards in Science

Funding teams of researchers, consisting of independent research groups, to work together on the most important scientific problems that can only be solved through collaborative efforts.

Collaborative Awards in Humanities and Social Science

Promoting the development of new ideas and bringing disciplines together to speed the pace of discovery. This scheme funds teams who are tackling major health-related questions in the humanities and social sciences that require a collaborative approach.

Seed Awards in Science

Helping researchers develop novel ideas that will go on to form part of larger grant applications to the Wellcome Trust or elsewhere.

Seed Awards in Humanities and Social Science

Helping researchers develop compelling and innovative ideas that may go on to form part of larger grant applications.

Master's Fellowships in Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Providing junior researchers with the opportunity to gain research experience and training at Master's degree level. The scheme aims to support research that will improve public health and tropical medicine at a local, national and global level.

Training Fellowships in Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Offering research experience and training to early-stage researchers from low- and middle-income countries. The scheme aims to support research that will improve public health and tropical medicine at a local, national and global level.

PhD Training Fellowships for Clinicians

Offering clinicians the opportunity to undertake a PhD within a structured and mentored training environment.

Public Engagement Fund

This funding is for anyone with a great idea for engaging the public in conversations about health-related science and research. 

Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowships

Offering recently qualified postdoctoral researchers the opportunity to start independent research careers, working in some of the best research environments in the world.

Inspiring Science Fund

Supporting science centres across the UK. It's a capital fund that helps centres rethink what they do and what they offer to the public. 

Research Fellowships in Humanities and Social Science

Supporting humanities researchers and social scientists who want to explore areas of health but do not hold established academic posts.

Engagement Fellowships

Supporting and developing the careers of emerging leaders in public engagement.

Clinical Research Career Development Fellowships

Enabling medical, dental, veterinary and clinical psychology graduates to continue their research at postdoctoral level and develop scientific independence. The scheme provides support for up to eight years and the flexibility to balance research and clinical responsibilities.

Intermediate Fellowships in Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Helping mid-career researchers from low- and middle-income countries establish independent research programmes in those countries. The scheme aims to support research that will improve public health and tropical medicine at a local, national and global level.

Sir Henry Dale Fellowships

Providing support for postdoctoral researchers who aim to become independent scientists leading their own groups. The scheme is a partnership between the Royal Society and the Wellcome Trust.

Research Career Development Fellowships

Providing support for postdoctoral researchers at academic organisations in the Republic of Ireland who aim to become independent scientists leading their own group.

Research Career Re-entry Fellowships

Offering postdoctoral research scientists the opportunity to re-establish their scientific careers after a continuous break from research of at least two years.

Principal Research Fellowships

Providing long-term funding for senior research scientists of international standing.

Senior Research Fellowships in Basic Biomedical Science

Providing support for independent researchers at academic organisations in the UK and Republic of Ireland who'll become leaders in their scientific field.

Senior Research Fellowships in Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Enabling researchers from low- and middle-income countries to establish themselves as leading investigators in their scientific field. The scheme aims to support research that will improve public health and tropical medicine at a local, national and global level.

Senior Research Fellowships in Clinical Science

Giving clinical academics the opportunity to develop their research potential and to establish themselves as leading investigators.

Biomedical Vacation Scholarships

Providing promising undergraduates with hands-on experience of research during the summer vacation, with the aim of encouraging them to consider a career in research.

Research Resources Grants: Support for libraries and archives

Improving access to health-related library and archive collections across the UK and Republic of Ireland by supporting cataloguing, conservation and digitisation projects.

Research Bursaries

Supporting individuals working on small and medium-scale research projects that focus on library or archive collections supported by the Wellcome Trust. 

Research Awards for Health Professionals

Offering practising health professionals the opportunity to carry out humanities or social science research, in any area of health.

Wellcome Trust and National Institutes of Health Four-year PhD Studentships 

Offering postgraduate students collaborative PhD training at academic laboratories in the UK or Republic of Ireland and at the National Institutes of Health in the USA.

Four-year PhD Studentships in Science

Offering the most promising students in-depth postgraduate training at 32 programmes throughout the UK.

Four-year PhD Programmes in Science

Supporting PhD programmes in the UK and Republic of Ireland to train biomedical and public health researchers.

Doctoral Studentships

Enabling researchers to undertake humanities or social science doctoral degrees in any area of health.

PhD Programmes for Clinicians

Inviting organisations to establish PhD programmes for clinical academics.

Science Media Studentships

Offering financial support for PhD-level biomedical scientists to undertake postgraduate qualifications at Imperial College London or the National Film and Television School (NFTS).

University Awards in Humanities and Social Science

Enabling humanities and social science researchers to gain permanent positions at academic organisations.

The Hub Award

Bringing researchers and other creative professionals together at Wellcome Collection, to work on a two-year project.

Master's Awards in Humanities and Social Science

Enabling researchers to undertake humanities or social science Master's courses in any area of health.

Springboard - Health of the Public 2040 Awards

Supporting health social sciences and medical humanities researchers to launch independent careers. The scheme is a collaboration between the Academy of Medical Sciences (AMS) and Wellcome.

Springboard Awards

Providing small grants to support basic biomedical scientists as they develop their independent research careers. The scheme is a collaboration between the Academy of Medical Sciences (AMS) and the Wellcome Trust.

Daniel Turnberg Travel Fellowships

Offering short-term funding for biomedical researchers to travel between the UK and the Middle East to learn new techniques and develop academic collaborations.

Joint Global Health Trials scheme

Funding late-stage trials of interventions that will provide evidence to help improve health in low- and middle-income countries.

International Research Scholars Programme

Supporting early-career scientists who have trained in the UK or US and want to establish independent research programmes in a country outside of the G7.

Joint Health Systems Research Initiative

Supporting research based in low- and middle-income countries to improve health systems in those locations.

Starter Grants for Clinical Lecturers

Providing small grants to enable clinical lecturers to pursue their research work, gather preliminary data and strengthen their applications for longer-term fellowships and funding.

Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises programme

Providing support for research institutes and humanitarian organisations that work in partnership to improve health outcomes in humanitarian crises.

Sustaining Excellence Awards

Giving long-term support to organisations we've already funded, to increase the impact of their public engagement projects and develop new ways of working. This scheme helps organisations plan for the future and become more resilient.

Cryo-Electron Microscopy Equipment Grants

For structural and cell biologists who want to use cryo-electron microscopy equipment in their research. 

Europe and Global Challenges

Encouraging European and international researchers to work together on global health and environmental challenges. The scheme is funded by the Volkswagen Foundation, the Riksbankens Jubileumsfond and the Wellcome Trust.

Public Engagement Funding within Research Grants

Providing funding for Wellcome Trust researchers to engage the public with their work.

Biomedical Resource and Technology Development Grants

Providing support for researchers who want to establish or maintain biomedical resources (including databases and collections) for the benefit of the wider scientific community.

Multi-user Equipment Grants

Providing support for multi-user items of equipment.

Small Grants in Humanities and Social Science

Supporting small-scale research projects, scoping exercises and meetings.


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Membership

The main criterion for election as a ARABWAYS Member is scientific excellence. Only those scientists who have made significant contributions to the advancement of science can be nominated as Members

Becoming a member is easy! Just make sure you have all of the items listed below :

  • Curriculum Vitae/Resume
  • Students and Postdocs: Proof of enrollment/status such as letter of acceptance and contact information for a department/faculty contact. 
  • Membership form