Ouzir

Ouzir

We welcome you to the EBRS Meeting, which will take place 30 July – 3 August 2017 in Amsterdam. The meeting will be organized in association with the Japanese Society for Chronobiology and the Chinese Society for Biological Rhythms and will be held in the Academic Medical Center (AMC) of the University of Amsterdam (UvA) located in the South East of Amsterdam, near the Bijlmer Arena train station and within walking distance from the Holendrecht metro station. Accomodation for delegates will be available in hotels and inexpensive student accomodations around the Bijlmer Arena station and throughout the city center.

We have an exciting scientific programme lined up, with several opportunities for oral and poster communications of your research. EBRS2017 will be an excellent opportunity to promote your research, network with early career researchers in the field and enjoy the Amsterdam social scene.

Finally, although we cannot guarantee good weather, we are sure that the quality and variety of the scientific programme, together with the social programme will make Amsterdam 2017 a meeting to enjoy and remember.

We are looking forward to seeing you in Amsterdam.
The Local Organising Committee

Registration


The theme is inspired on the fundamental physiological process from the cells to the whole systems functions, which are based on rhythms and cycles. Considering that the Physiological Sciences are handling the process that determine the life, the theme of the 38th IUPS Congress in Brazil will be oriented to theRHYTHMS OF LIFE.This theme also combines with the Brazilian culture and Brazilians’ life style in which the music, sports and a rich natural environment make a perfect scenario for a real experience about THERHYTHMS OF LIFE. Visit our website atwww.iups2017.com


Public Engagement Grants of up to £5000 are available to both Member and non-Members of The Society to promote the discussion of physiology with public audiences. 

We encourage collaborative applications, including those between expert science communicators, facilitators of public engagement, artists, musicians, thespians and our Members. Please contact the Society if you would like to be connected with a physiologist. 

The grant scheme aims to:

  • Inspire creative public engagement with physiology
  • Stimulate physiologists to share their stories, passion and expertise in innovative ways with wider audiences, particularly those that are traditionally hard to reach 
  • Increase dialogue between researchers and the public, in particular on topics such as the relevance of research to health, medicine and performance. 
  • Produce materials and resources which can be used for further public engagement and outreach work. 

Projects should:

  • Deliver a better understanding of physiology to lay audiences. 
  • Consider longevity and legacy.
  • Consider impact on both audiences and researchers.

Terms and conditions

  • Applications should be submitted by 11.59pm, Saturday 31 December 2016. 
  • Funds received through this grant scheme must only be used for the purpose outline in the application. 
  • Copies of generated material should be submitted to The Society where applicable. Physical material should be made readily available to Society Members either free or on low-cost loan or purchase for a period of at least 5 years after termination of the project. 
  • The Society must be acknowledged in all promotional material, website and at the event itself, and logo usage must be signed off by the office. 
  • Grant holder must provide regular feedback on the status of the activity/event to The Society Outreach Officer. 
  • Project should be completed within 12 months of funding unless discussed with the Outreach Officer.
  • Upon completion of the project you will be required to

Produced a detailed post-activity report detailing activities, outcomes and recommendations within 12 weeks. 

Complete a project learning and evaluation form. 

Work with the Outreach Officer to produce an e-book of resources for use by The Society’s Membership where applicable. 

Produce a poster to be displayed at meetings, on our website and featured in our magazine. 

  • Unspent funds must be returned to The Society. 
  • Proof of payments associated with this grant must be kept for a period of 3 months following the end of the grant period and, on request, provide us with such information.

If your are already registered in our portal click here to apply.

If you are not registered in our portal please click here to create a guest login. 
 

If you do not comply with the terms and conditions set out here, or if the grant is not used for the purpose with which it is given, the funds will be repayable at The Society's discretion.

The Society is committed to the principles of diversity, equality and inclusion, and thereby welcomes applications from individuals of all backgrounds. Applications that consider how to involve audiences from a range of different backgrounds (particularly those that are traditionally hard-to-reach) are encouraged.


Dear Colleagues,

It is our privilege and special pleasure to invite you to the 13th World Congress of Biological Psychiatry; the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) has chosen Copenhagen for its World Congress from 18 – 22 June 2017.

Following the impressive success of the 12th Congress of Biological Psychiatry in Athens, Copenhagen is believed to be an excellent setting to discuss the current progress in molecular biology, the development of novel drugs based upon new concepts, and the advances in modern neuroscience that will change our approach to psychiatric disorders and our attitudes towards mental health care.

...Read the invitation


The XXIII World Congress of Neurology (WCN 2017) will take place in Kyoto, Japan on September 16 – 21 2017, cohosted by the Japanese Society of Neurology, Societas Neurologica Japonica, and Asian and Oceanian Association of Neurology. This year's theme will be "Defining the Future of Neurology".​​

Learn More​



A multidisciplinary team including researchers from the Montreal Neurological Institute has improved our understanding of how cannabinoids, the active agent in marijuana, affect vision in vertebrates.

Scientists used a variety of methods to test how tadpoles react to visual stimuli when they’ve been exposed to increased levels of exogenous or endogenous cannabinoids. Exogenous cannabinoids are artificially introduced drugs, whereas endogenous cannabinoids occur naturally in the body.

They found that, contrary to what they expected, activating cannabinoid signaling in tadpoles actually increased the activity in their retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which are responsible for transmitting information about light detection from the eye to the brain. Previous studies found that cannabinoids typically work to reduce neurotransmission, not increase it.

“Initially you distrust yourself when you see something that goes against widely held ideas, but we tried the experiment so many times, using diverse techniques, and it was a consistent result,” says Ed Ruthazer, a professor of neurology and neurosurgery at the Montreal Neurological Institute of McGill University, and the paper’s senior author. “So then we knew we had to figure out what was going on. The first tendency is to want to ignore it. But it was such a strong effect, we knew there was something important here.”

What the researchers found is that one class of cannabinoid receptor, known as CB1R, plays a role in the suppression of chloride transport into the RGCs. When the receptor is activated, chloride levels are reduced, which hyperpolarizes the cell, making it able to fire at higher frequencies when stimulated.

For the tadpoles, this meant they were able to detect dimmer objects in low light than when they had not been exposed to increased levels of cannabinoids. The team used software developed with McGill physics and chemistry professor Paul Wiseman to detect behavior changes in the tadpoles.

It is too early to say if cannabinoids have the same effect on human vision, but there is anecdotal evidence in scientific literature of cannabis ingestion improving night vision of Jamaican and Moroccan fishermen.

What’s more interesting however, according to Ruthazer, is that they have discovered a previously unknown role for cannabinoids in brain signaling. Therapeutic use of cannabinoids is becoming increasingly accepted by the medical community, and the need for an accurate and thorough understanding of these chemicals’ role in the brain is greater than ever.

“Our work provides an exciting potential mechanism for cannabinoid regulation of neuronal firing, but it will obviously be important to confirm that similar mechanisms are also at play in the eyes of mammals,” says Ruthazer. “Though technically more challenging, a similar study should now be performed in the mouse retina or even in cultures of human retinal cells.”

Source


All neurons in our brain are wired via a micron-sized connection unit called synapse, and each synapse contains a layer of densely-packed, protein rich compartment called postsynaptic density (PSD), which is responsible for brain signal processing and transmission. Mutations of genes encoding PSD proteins are major causes of psychiatric disorders including autisms, schizophrenia, and intellectual disabilities (ID). While the existence of PSDs has been known to scientists for 60 years, how PSDs form and change in response to brain activities are poorly understood.

In a recent study, scientists from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) discover that SynGAP and PSD-95, two abundance proteins in PSD that are known to cause autisms when mutated, can form an autonomously assembled network structure both in test-tube and in living cells. Most surprisingly, the SynGAP/PSD-95 assembly can form stable “oil-like” droplets in the midst of aqueous cytoplasm of living cells via a phenomena called phase-transition. This finding provides a possible answer for the long-lasting question of PSD formation in the field of brain science. Importantly, the HKUST team also found that defects of SynGAP or PSD-95 identified in autism patients alter the “oil-like” droplets formation of the complex and change the synaptic signaling activity of neurons.

Their research was published in the journal Cell on August 25, 2016.

“SynGAP and PSD-95 are famous for their roles in learning and memory as well as their involvements in diseases like autisms and epilepsy when mutated, but exactly how these two proteins carry out their functions are not very clear” said Professor Mingjie Zhang, leader of the research group. “Our studies of the SynGAP/PSD-95 complex, via a multifaceted approach, led to an unexpected finding that living neurons can "borrow” a very fundamental phenomena called phase-transition to place different functional units at specific cellular locations". Prof. Zhang added, “everyone has seen phase transition in our daily life. Liquid water turning into ice is a form of phase transition. Living cells can selectively "pick” certain proteins or nucleic acids to undergo phase transition forming a non-membrane-enclosed cellular compartments, so their physiological functions can be regulated.“

"Our work also provides mechanistic insights into why mutations altering the SynGAP/PSD-95 interaction can contribute to various brain disorders including seizure, autism, and ID, a spectrum of central nervous system diseases that have no treatments. We believe that our discovery will also inspire new ways to develop therapeutic methods for these devastating diseases to human society”, said. Menglong Zeng, the paper’s first author and a Ph.D. student in Prof. Zhang’s laboratory.

“This study is only the beginning of teasing out how other proteins collectively contribute to the formation and brain activity-dependent alterations of PSD.” Prof. Zhang said. “We are also interested in trying to find out whether other synapses, the neuron/muscle connections for an example, also adopt the phase-transition strategy to build their PSDs”.

Source


Research grants are provided for teams of scientists from different countries who wish to combine their expertise in innovative approaches to questions that could not be answered by individual laboratories.

Emphasis is placed on novel collaborations that bring together scientists preferably from different disciplines (e.g. from chemistry, physics, computer science, engineering) to focus on problems in the life sciences.

The research teams must be international. The principal applicant must be from one of the eligible countries. However, other participating scientists and laboratories may be situated anywhere in the world.

Applicants must submit a letter of intent to apply for a research grant via the HFSP web site with a deadline at the end of March, and after review, selected teams will be invited to submit a full application.

Two types of Research Grant are available: Young Investigators' Grants and Program Grants

Young Investigators' Grants are awarded to teams of researchers, all of whom are within the first five years after obtaining an independent laboratory (e.g. Assistant Professor, Lecturer or equivalent). Applications for Young Investigators' Grants will be reviewed in competition with each other independently of applications for Program Grants. Program Grants are awarded to teams of independent researchers at any stage of their careers. The research team is expected to develop new lines of research through the collaboration. Up to $450,000 per grant per year may be applied for. Applications including independent investigators early in their careers are encouraged

WEBSITE


WFN Grants and Awards

Published in Grants & Awards novembre 15 2016 2 Tagged under

The WFN make available a number of grants and awards on an annual basis.  These are:

Educational Grants

Each year the WFN provides a number of educational grants to projects which aim to improve brain health worldwide, through research or education.

Read more >

WCN 2017 Congress Bursaries

A limited number of bursaries will be ​awarded to young neurologists who wish to attend the Congress. 

The bursary comprises of free Congress Registration and a Travel Grant of €500.

Applications for bursaries will open in February 2017.


Junior Travelling Fellowships

The Junior Travelling Fellowships are awarded to young neurologists from countries classified by the World Bank as Low or Lower Middle Income, to attend approved international meetings.

Read more >


Page 9 sur 16

Arabways Newsletter

Sign up to our newsletter

  

Recent Twitter Posts

Membership

The main criterion for election as a ARABWAYS Member is scientific excellence. Only those scientists who have made significant contributions to the advancement of science can be nominated as Members

Becoming a member is easy! Just make sure you have all of the items listed below :

  • Curriculum Vitae/Resume
  • Students and Postdocs: Proof of enrollment/status such as letter of acceptance and contact information for a department/faculty contact. 
  • Membership form